Quick Answer: How Do You Say Good Luck In Navajo?

What does Yadilah mean in Navajo?

Jééhkał Summary: The Navajo term jééhkał is a way of saying that there’s been a loss of hearing.

It is used to describe both those that are hard of hearing and those that are completely deaf..

How do you say love in Navajo?

Ayóó Ánííníshní (I love you in Navajo)

How do you say cheers in Navajo?

A collection of useful phrases in Navajo (Diné Bizaad), an Athabaskan language spoken in Arizona and New Mexico in the USA….Useful phrases in Navajo.EnglishDiné Bizaad (Navajo)Cheers! Good Health! (Toasts used when drinking)Ahóá!Have a nice dayNizhónígo Nee Ado’ááł56 more rows

How do you say friend in Navajo?

Literally: my friend. The Navajo word ak’is means friend, so shí, ní, or bí is attached to mean my, your, or his (her). This word is essentially used to describe siblings and maternal cousins, but in all of these cases it only applies to people of the same sex.

How do you say lucky in Navajo?

This is a way to describe luck in Navajo. It means “You’re lucky” if used in this way.

How do you say good in Navajo?

Literally: it is good (alternatively: it is well). This is the way to say hello in Navajo, and is the common Navajo greeting.

How do you say have a great day in Navajo?

Nizhónígo Nee Ado’ááł Have a nice day!

How do you say good night in Navajo?

Good Night in Navajo is Yá’át’ééh hiiłchi’į’.

How do you say beautiful in Navajo?

Nizhóní means beautiful. On one hand it can refer to something that’s attractive, and on the other it refers to something that is good. This is because the Navajo idea of beauty goes beyond appearances.

How do you say dumb in Navajo?

Diigis=Stupid – Navajo Word of the Day | Facebook.

How do you say white person in Navajo?

The idea behind the origin of the Navajo word bilagáana is not entirely clear. It’s meaning is, though. It’s the Navajo name for white people, or people of Caucasian descent.

How do you introduce yourself in Navajo?

Introducing Yourself in NavajoYá’át’ééh (It is good; welcome; hello)shik’éí dóó shidine’é (my family and my people, friends)